Local Food & Foreign Wine: A Perfect Match



Local Food & Foreign Wine: A Perfect Match
Words by Jennifer Marshall

Cayman’s culinary legacy has developed through a melange of local dishes and regional influences from across the Caribbean and beyond. What better way to celebrate the rich and varied flavours of our local cuisine than by complementing your favourite meal with a perfectly paired bottle of wine. Local certified sommelier Roberto Logioia believes that “The gourmet world is as complex as the wine world” and that the key to a perfect pairing is to balance the ingredients and flavours of your chosen dish with the wine-making process and earth terrain of the grapes characteristic of a particular wine variety. With Roberto’s expert guidance, we’ve paired a selection of quintessentially Caribbean dishes with some of the best value-for-money wines on-Island, ensuring a well-balanced palette at every level.

Poultry | Jerk Chicken
Jerk is a traditional Jamaican seasoning combining, amongst others, the essential ingredients of allspice berries, hot peppers, thyme and cinnamon. Jerk is traditionally used as a rub to flavour meat before it is grilled or smoked slowly over a fire-pit of pimento wood. The hot and spicy flavours from jerk chicken, coupled with the smokiness from its preparation, are well complemented by a Rosé d’Anjou from the Loire Valley, France. The slightly mild, soft, clean, fresh and fruit-forward notes of this particular variety of rosé mellow the spiciness and charcoal flavours of the jerk.
Consider: Les Gardelles Rosé d’Anjou CI$12



Seafood | Marinated Conch Salad
Conch is best identified by its large, pink shell and has a distinctive, sweet flavour. It is characteristically quite tough and in this dish, the conch is tenderised by, and virtually cooked in, lime juice, similar to the preparation of ceviche. The very crisp and clean Muscadet from the Loire region compliments this seafood dish, along with its citrus notes of lemon and tangerine flavours. With hints of lemon-lime, the finish lingers, rounding out some of the saltiness.
Consider: Muscadet L’Aubienière CI$14


Fish | Cayman-Style Snapper
The firm texture of snapper with its sweet, nutty flavour lends itself to everything from hot chillies to subtle herbs. In this Caymanian favourite, it is pan fried with onions, tomatoes, sweet pepper and scotch bonnet pepper. A sparkling white wine from the Loire Valley complements this dish with flavours of fresh peaches and pear and tiny bubbles and evolves gracefully across the palate with a nice, persistent aromatic note.
Consider: De Chanceny Crémant de Loire CI$22



Seafood | Marinated Conch Salad
Conch is best identified by its large, pink shell and has a distinct, sweet flavour. It is characteristically quite tough and in this dish, the conch is tenderised by, and virtually cooked in, lime juice, similar to the preparation of a ceviche. The very crisp and clean Muscadet from the Loire region compliments this seafood dish, along with its crisp citrus notes and lemon and tangerine flavours. With hints of lemon-lime, the finish lingers with some of the saltiness rounding out.
Consider: Muscadet L’Aubienière CI$14



Dessert | Key Lime Pie
Also known as the ‘West Indian Lime’, key limes have a higher acidity and stronger aroma than your everyday variety and make this a refreshing dessert. The texture and softness of a late harvest Sauvignon Blanc dessert wine from Chile balances acidity with lime, marmalade, honey, mango and pear. The smooth and long finish and fragrant elements of the dessert wine combine wonderfully to compliment this delicious treat.
Consider: Concho y Toro Late Harvest (375ml, half-bottle) CI$8